How to save money at Whole Foods

With food prices skyrocketing, Whole Foods has become known to some as “Whole Paycheck.” The upscale chain has been hit by the slow economy and has seen its profits drop as consumers shop elsewhere.

Not wanting to lose its customers, Whole Foods has come up with a solution. They have “value gurus” who will take customers on a tour of the store and teach them how to save money shopping at Whole Foods – they highlight their own 365 brand, which I personally purchase and for the most part, it’s very good. They have also launch a website called The Whole Deal where customers share their stories.

Some interesting things I did not know about are:
• You get a 10% discount when buying 10 pounds or more of meat and/or fish
• They accept coupons from other stores

Certainly it is not “the” answer, but there are helpful tips nonetheless. Many just say the extra price is worth it (which supports their higher prices, not how to save).

Some comments are customers have a piece of mind knowing they can shop with confidence. This is true for nearly all of the store, but if you shop the body care section, I would encourage you to read labels there. I am avoiding PEG-ingredients when at all possible (and it IS possible) as well as fragrance, dioxanes, phthalates and other things that are still commonly found even in natural and organic products.

But overall, good job Whole Foods for sharing tricks for saving $$ in your stores and allowing customers to share their experience in saving money as well.

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One response to this post.

  1. Hi,

    You may or may not know that over here in the UK Whole Foods has lost £10 million in its first year in business. This is reportedly due to the financial situation and customers cutting back on their food.

    I agree fully about the body care section. It’s pretty much the same over here. There is no legal restriction of the word organic or natural on cosmetic products so you have to be on your guard so to speak.

    There is a ray of light though! The soil association (UK based indepedent regulatory body) provide strict organic standards for a whole range of bodycare products. You’ll find it hard to see anything nasty in the ingredients from a soil association certified product.

    alex

    Reply

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