Posts Tagged ‘home’

Product Review: Charlie’s Soap Laundry Detergent

I saw Charlie’s Soap on Amazon as an eco-friendly laundry soap. On a trip to Whole Foods, they had some in the store, so I decided to try some since I was in need of laundry detergent anyway.

The soap is intended to clean your clothes without leaving behind any residue. In fact, they recommend running a load with just Charlie’s Soap to clear the washing machine of all detergent residues. I will admit, I did not do this. I did do a small load the first time, though.

The soap cleans well, does not leave residue and is not scented. In fact, the package says “If you want flowers, go pick some.” It works just as it promised to do. It is great for people with sensitive skin. I will say that they do not recommend fabric softener, but I found my clothes still needed it. They were a little stiff without it. I used Seventh Generation’s fabric softener.

In fact, I did not realize the difference until I picked up an article of clothing tht had not yet been washed in Charlie’s Soap and I was surprised how much detergent and fabric softener residue I could feel on the garment. I am not sure how I wore those clothes washed in conventional detergent (sorry Proctor and Gamble).

The best part is it’s economical as well. It’s about $13 from Amazon  for a bag that will do 80 loads so that equates to 16 cents a load (though truth be told, I am pretty sure I got mine from Whole Foods for less than this on sale). And yes, 1 tablespoon of the soap is all that is needed, so that bag is small as well. So it is eco-friendly in that respect too.

Overall I give this product an A. I would go ahead and try without fabric softeners as they recommend, and if you find you do need one, I would recommend Seventh Generation’s fabric softener, I personally like the blue eucalyptus

Also available in liquid form
This review refers to the powder form.

Granite Countertops May Be Radioactive

I came across this article today, though had seen similar mentions in the last few days. Granite countertops have been detected as having high levels of radon — enough to potentially contaminate the air quality of your home. A home radon detection kit may help you determine if your family is at risk. I am also very glad I did not go for granite in my kitchen!

So what types of counter tops are safe? Many formica countertops have a laminate over particle board and particle board is known to emit gases like formaldahyde. So that’s not great news either.

A friend of mine poured concrete countertops — durable, modern and non-toxic. They loved them.

There are several other eco-friendly options here including recycled glass, end-grain bamboo, recycled paper, sustainable wood, and recycled aluminum. Personally, I would avoid the aluminum as it has its own issues (ie, may be linked to Alzhiemer’s).

Other options are Enviroglas, Lithistone, Syndecrete and IceStone.

Related articles
Vinyl shower curtains emit toxic chemicals
Antibacterial products contain toxin Triclosan
Lead in the Garden Hose
Congress Passes Ban on Phthalates

Estrogen Mimicry of Bisphenol-A Threatens Human and Animal Health

Very interesting. This article is stating that BPA found in canned foods, baby bottles, plastic containers and wrap, etc. could be a factor in obesity and other health problems, such as diabetes and ADD/ADAH. 

(NaturalNews) Bisphenol-A could be making us fatter. Diet and too little exercise are the main culprits of what has been called the obesity epidemic, but the hormone mimicker bisphenol-A might be tipping the scales, so to speak.

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is mainly found in polycarbonate plastic, which is labeled with the number 7; in plastic food wrap, and in the resins that coat the inside of metal cans for food. It is so prevalent in today’s products that it is even in refrigerator shelving, water bottles, plastic food storage containers, water pipes and flooring.

BPA is an endocrine disrupter that mimics the hormone estrogen. Studies have shown harmful biological effects on animals using low-doses of the chemical and harmful effects on humans have been observed outside of studies. Hormone disrupting effects have been shown to occur at levels of application as low as 2-5 pars per billion and many canned foods are within and over this range. [1] With such a low level of toxicity, it’s easy to see how even a minuscule rate of bisphenol-A (BPA) leakage from plastics disturbs many people. The damaging effects of the chemical include impairment and unnatural changes to sex organs and their functions, increased tumor formation, hyperactivity, neurotoxin effects, and signs of early puberty have been observed. Clearly, BPA’s toxic effects are diverse.

A recent study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered that about 93% of the United States population have bisphenol-A in their body at a median concentration of 2.7 ppb. [2]

Read the entire article.

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  • Whole Foods private label canned food contain BPA
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  • Plastics additive raises safety fears

    Plastics additive raises safety fears
    By Wade Rawlins
    McClatchey Newspapers

    The plastic additive is leaching from your water bottles, soda cans, baby bottles, microwaveable dishes — just about anything made of certain lightweight clear plastics.

    And it mimics the hormone estrogen, which some research indicates could harm human health, particularly the development of fetuses and newborn babies.

    Known as BPA, bisphenol-A has been used in commercial production of lightweight plastics and epoxy resins since the 1950s. Billions of pounds are produced annually. Traces of it are found in almost everyone — including the umbilical cord blood of newborn babies.

    Although the chemical industry contends that the weight of scientific evidence on bisphenol-A doesn’t support claims of harm, the chemical remains controversial. Studies flagging the compound’s possible health threat to humans have made people nervous about the plastics they use every day to serve and store food.

    “There is a cause for concern,” said Gerald LeBlanc, chairman of the department of environmental and molecular toxicology at N.C. State.

    “It’s not something we should be sweeping under the rug.”

    Read the entire article.

    Related Articles:

  • “Cheat sheet” of BPA-free sippy cups and bottles
  • Pregnant women told to avoid BPA
  • Today Show report on BPA & plastic safety
  • BPA may lead to health problems such as obesity and ADD/ADHD
  • Whole Foods private label canned food contain BPA
  • Canned foods and BPA
  • BPA is found in infant formula
  • Gerber baby food containers
  • BPA and other plastic safety
  • Z Recommends: The Z Report on BPA In Infant Care Products, Third Edition
  • Environmental Working Group: Guide to Baby Safe Bottles & Formula
  • Environmental Working Groups Report on BPA in Baby Formula
  • Breastmilk contains stem cells
  • Breastmilk cures
  • Can breastmilk cure cancer?