Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer’

Natural, homemade deodorant recipe

Roughly 7 years ago, I learned that aluminum was linked to Alzheimer’s disease, and even more recently learned of it’s potential link to breast cancer. So I set out to rid my life of aluminum. Aluminum is the active ingredient in most antiperspirants, so I tried several natural deodorants. Some worked better than others, but nothing seemed to work for my husband. He either broke out or smelled. Neither of which was acceptable.

Then I found a homemade recipe that got rave reviews, so I figured, “Why not?”

The recipe is easy to make, inexpensive and it WORKS! My husband is amazed and has been singing the praises of this homemade deo. He has not had any odor issues since using this, even after playing basketball.

Coconut oil has antibacterial properties, so it will not spoil and is likely the main reason this is so effective since body odor is caused by bacteria. I’m just beginning to see all the wonderful uses for coconut oil.

The recipe is very simple:
5-6 tablespoons of coconut oil (use in solid form)
¼ cup baking soda
¼ cup cornstarch or arrowroot powder

Mix together the baking soda and cornstarch (or arrowroot powder) until blended. Add in the coconut oil until you get the same consistency as regular deo. You can store in a lidded container and apply with your fingertips or an empty deodorant container (which is the easiest to use). 

To avoid any redness, I reduced the amount of baking soda just slightly and added some Shea butter (probably 1 tsp – 1 tbls).

Also, check out the comments in the post to find other ideas of things to add. Like a drop or so of tea tree oil for added antibacterial properties, or essential oils for a nice scent.

BPA linked to chemotherapy resistance

New research show BPA can reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments. Not surprising since previous research shows BPA can cause cancer.

“In tests on breast cancer cells, researchers from the University of Cincinnati found that Bisphenol A (BPA) may protect cancer cells from dying off when they are exposed to anti-cancer drugs.”

UC researchers used the same low-dose amounts of BPA that are found in the normal adult.

“They found that BPA acts on cancer cells in a similar manner to estrogen. Estrogen stimulates the creation of proteins that protect cancer cells from chemotherapy drugs.
Researchers have long known about this estrogen-induced effect on chemotherapy. However, they have been puzzled by the fact that some women who have less estrogen in their system, such as post-menopausal women, can still be resistant to anti-cancer medications.

The researchers said the findings will help scientists determine why these and other cancer patients, such as those with advanced stages of the disease, are resistant to chemotherapy.”

Very interesting findings. Wonder what the FDA and their cronies in the plastics industry will say to dismiss this?

This is yet another study, in a long and growing list, that shows BPA is indeed harmful at even low doses considered “safe” by the FDA.

Banning BPA will certainly send a message to manufacturers (who are already feeling the pinch in the baby product industry) and the government, that we will not stand for this. BPA is commonly found in the lining of canned foods and soda cans, dental fillings, polycarbonate water bottles, polycarbonate baby bottles and likely lurks in other areas we do not even think about – medical equipment for one.

How do you avoid BPA? Typically, BPA is found in polycarbonate plastic containers – look at the bottom of the container, if a recycle #7 symbol is there, it very likely contains BPA. However, it does not ALWAYS mean BPA is present – i.e. some of those single serve fruit contains are layered plastic and must be labeled as #7. But if the plastic is translucent and hard like glass, it’s more than likely made of BPA. Avoid canned foods (except the Eden Organics line which use another technology and their cans are BPA-free) and canned sodas. If you formula feed—watch out, many formula cans are lined with BPA, so at minimum use a powdered formula and not a liquid.

Sources: CTV.ca, Science Daily and the Daily Green

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