The Dangerous Impact of Food Coloring
Americans are now eating 5 times more food dye than in 1955.

Many parents have observed their child’s behavior improve drastically when taken off food dyes, especially Red #40. Because of this widespread anecdotal evidence, the editors at Special Education Degree decided to do an investigative report on the negative effects of food dye’s in human beings.

The hidden dangers of food coloring dyes:

🔵 Blue #1 Brilliant Blue

Known Dangers:

Caused kidney tumors in mice
May induce an allergic reaction in individuals with pre-existing asthma

Commonly found in: baked goods, beverages, candies, cereal

🔵 Blue #2 Indigo Carmine

Known Dangers:

Causes significant occurrence of tumors, particularly brain gliomas, in male rats

Commonly found in: beverages, candies, dog food

🔴 Citrus Red #2

Known Dangers:

Toxic to rats and mice at modest levels
Bladder and other tumors found in mice
Labeled “possibly carcinogenic to humans”by the IARC

Commonly found in: skin of Florida oranges

🟢 Green #3 Fast Green

Known Dangers:

As a food dye it is prohibited in the EU and some other countries.

Caused significant increases in bladder tumors in male rats.

Commonly found in: beverages, candies, ice cream, cosmetics.

🔴 Red #40 Allura Red

Known Dangers:

Accelerates the appearance of immune system tumors in mice.

Suspected trigger of hyperactivity in children
Causes allergy-like reactions in some people.

Commonly found in: beverages, candies, cereal, cosmetics

🔴 Red #3 Erythrosine

Known Dangers:

Suspected trigger of hyperactivity in children
Thyroid carcinogen in animals.
Issued a partial ban by the FDA in 1990

Commonly found in: baked goods, candies, sausage, maraschino cherries.

🟡 Yellow #5 Tartrazine

Known Dangers:

Can cause allergy-like reactions
May cause mild to severe hypersensitiviy reactions

Commonly found in: baked goods, candies, cereal, beverages

🟡 Yellow #6 Sunset Yellow

Known Dangers:

May cause hyperactivity in some children
Causes adrenal tumors in animals.

Commonly found in: baked goods, sausage, cereal, cosmetics.

Alternatives to Artificial Dyes Include:

Beets

Carrots

Spinach

Pumpkin

Berries

Red cabbage

Turmeric powder

Saffron powder

Paprika

Natural dyes do not have as concentrated color as artificial ones. Thus, more must be used, which may affect taste. They’re also more sensitive to heat, so colors may vary.

Now, 30%-40% of the nation’s food is colored with naturally-derived food dyes. Organic food has no added dyes or preservatives.

On food labels, artificial dyes are often identified by their alternative names.

Learn more about the effects on young children here.

Want even more of this type of content in a community setting? Join my Facebook group, Natural and Holistic Living Mama.

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